Mangrove Restoration

What are mangroves and why restore them?

Mangroves is a wetland ecosystem that provides the greatest ecosystem services to the animals and to the communities living nearby. They provide coastal protection from storms and waves, livelihood, and shore stabilization. They also support fisheries such as shrimps, shells and crabs and directly support the livelihood and food for the coastal Filipinos.

They exist in subtropical and tropical areas covering less than 1% of all tropical forests worldwide yet they sequester four to fives times more carbon than the tropical forest which ultimately mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Philippines deforestation rate was 0.11% every year between 2000 – 2012. And with the increase in population, there might be more demand for coastal development, and land conversion to aquaculture.

 

Our Philosophy

Saving the ecosystem means saving the wildlife and the communities who depend on it for food, shelter, and livelihood. This interconnectedness needs to be better seen.

We follow science-based methods for restoration. We don’t just plant like others do, but we engage, educate and employ communities, train and empower local government leaders, and monitor mangroves so it survives and benefit the communities and the biodiversity of the area. We always look at the long-term protection and conservation of mangroves.

What we do

We restore and protect in the Provinces of La Union, Misamis Oriental and Surigao del Sur. We are actively assisting our local government partners and grassroots communities with mangrove restoration training and protecting about 240 ha of mangrove forests.

Partners

The Oceancy is an international NGO whose goal is to protect the marine ecosystem through sustainable tourism, scientific research and awareness. The Oceancy runs both coral reef and mangroves restoration projects around the world in collaboration with other NGOs and local communities.
 
In addition, The Oceancy has developed sustainability projects for tour operators called Sustainability Improvement Programs (SIPs), whose goal is to reduce the human impact during activities such as scuba diving, snorkelling, whale watching and more, including one project dedicated to the correct use of plastic. Oceanus Conservation and The Oceancy actively collaborate to develop the mangrove project in the Philippines.
 
To find out more, visit: The Oceancy